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Monday, September 28, 2009

Updates from the Frontlines

Check out United Families International for updates in the fight to protect marriage in Washington, Maine, and Michigan.

There are also recent updates from New Jersey and California.

1 comment:

  1. Your update reminds me of a blurb I came across yesterday about gay marriage and it's effects on schools. We're all fighting this fight for families, no matter what state we live in. Isn't it interesting that those who push the gay agenda are so quick to hide the fact that they're pushing it in schools?

    Nothing to Do With Schools? Not So Fast.

    The No on 1 campaign says Question 1 has nothing to do with schools. How do they explain posters like the one Donald Mendell saw in his child’s school, detailed in his letter to the editors of the Bangor Daily News? There is already an effort to promote a gay agenda in our schools, and it will only accelerate if Question 1 fails and homosexual marriage becomes legal in Maine.

    Sex education?
    The editorial “Same-Sex Among Us” (BDN, Sept. 18) accused those who oppose a law changing the definition of marriage of falsehoods and of “bringing children into the fray.” Having attended the April hearing in Augusta regarding the law, I witnessed many gay-marriage supporters bringing children up to the microphone, often holding them up to make their point. Only one of the opponents of gay marriage did that in the more than three hours I was there. A 7- or 8-year-old child was led to the microphone sobbing that people “wouldn’t let her auntie get married.”

    Sex education is not the spearhead of the “homosexual marriage and behavior is equal to that of heterosexuality” message. It’s being done through the teachers who are forming clubs and organizing activities that purport to speak to harassment, but in fact are aggressively promoting an equality-of-behavior agenda with children in our schools. A club-approved poster, asking “When did you decide that you were straight?” has been placed, for the past two years, in our school hallway less than 50 feet from the main entrance. Try to read the words “When did you decide that you were straight” as might 13-year-old ninth-graders their first day of high school.

    Objections that these efforts are not in keeping with this stage of development have not been heard. A yes vote on Question 1 can make your voice heard; a no vote will give those who use children’s trusting nature to turn them against the natural law written in all people the power to silence the rest of us.

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